The Regents Road Bridge is GOOD for the Environment

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

By Katie Nelson Rodolico

There has been a lot of misinformation about how building the Regents Road Bridge is bad for the environment.  This is FALSE as born out in the city’s own data in their Final Program Environmental Impact Report  (PEIR).  In fact, the bridge solves several environmental problems.

Removing the bridge will make the air quality worse according to the city’s PEIR.  Again the PEIR refers to the Air Quality degradation with the current roadway configuration as significant and unmitigated.  The air quality issues associated with NOT building the bridge were so severe as to be a “violation of air quality standards”.   (Page 509 of the PEIR)

genessee traffic

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Idling Vehicles on Genesee Avenue

Removing the bridge from the plan would INCREASE greenhouse gas emissions.  This puts the removal of the bridge in direct conflict with the city’s Climate Action Plan and the 2050 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy.   (Page 509 of the PEIR)

The Regents Road Bridge is part of the City’s Master Bicycle Plan.  In fact the Regents Road Bridge completion is shown as a ‘high priority project’ for the Master Bicycle Plan (page 106 and 107 of the Master Bike Plan.)  Removing the bridge was considered a significant and unmitigated environmental impact in PEIR.  (See page 508 of the PEIR)

One of the mitigation strategies proposed included creating a “grade separation” under Governor Drive at Genesee.   This would involve digging adjacent to four gas stations.  Two of the gas stations are in active “Leaking Underground Storage Tank” status (LUST), and the other two stations were formerly in LUST status.   Obviously this would involve disturbing/stirring up this toxic dirt adjacent to homes and schools and extensive bioremediation.   This grade separation concept was proposed because the traffic, it’s associated greenhouse gas emissions, and public safety all were completely unacceptable without the bridge.  (Page 909 of the PEIR)

A bridge spanning over the canyon will not permanently disturb the canyon.  It will not pave the canyon.  It will not stop the bikers from biking, the runners from running, the hikers from hiking, or the explorers from exploring.   It provides a bike and pedestrian path for multi-modal transportation options.  We all breathe the air and we all are effected by greenhouse gas emissions – including the wildlife in the canyon.

Let’s build the bridge!

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/ucp_amendment_final_peir_0.pdf

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/final_july_2016_cap.pdf

http://www.sdforward.com/pdfs/RP_final/The%20Plan%20-%20combined.pdf

https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/legacy/planning/programs/transportation/mobility/pdf/bicycle_master_plan_final_dec_2013.pdf

About Citizens For The Regents Road Bridge

CITIZENS FOR THE REGENTS ROAD BRIDGE is a grassroots organization in the University City, Clairemont, Mira Mesa, La Jolla, Miramar, Kearny Mesa, and TierraSanta areas of San Diego. Our organization believes in the importance of effective action to improve safety, relieve traffic congestion, and improve multimodal transportation in these communities. Traffic congestion, particularly in the University City area on Genesee Avenue, has become unacceptable and has created significant risks for emergency responders, residents, and business owners. A city plan drawn up over 50 years ago detailed two major north-south surface street arteries serving these communities. One of them, the Clairemont Mesa Boulevard-Regents Road collector road, is still incomplete because of a number of lengthy delays in constructing a four lane bridge to transit Rose Canyon on Regents Road.
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One Response to The Regents Road Bridge is GOOD for the Environment

  1. Pingback: The Top 10 False Arguments About the Regents Road Bridge | Citizens For The Regents Road Bridge

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